Read Planeswalker by Lynn Abbey Online

planeswalker

Urza Triumphant The war between Urza and Mishra is over Brooding on the death of his brother at the hands of extraplanar forces, Urza drifts among the planes But the end of the Brothers War has transformed him into something greater Deep within his heart, a spark has been kindled to a flame that cannot be quenched Urza has become a planeswalker....

Title : Planeswalker
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : B07BNVJDK9
ISBN13 : -
Format Type : E-Book
Language : Englisch
Publisher : Wizards of the Coast 27 M rz 2018
Number of Pages : 502 Pages
File Size : 982 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Planeswalker Reviews

  • None
    2019-04-24 11:02

    The book Planeswalker: Artifacts Cycle - Book II written by Lynn Abbey was very well written. Its main purpose being to give story into the background of the Magic: the Gathering CCG (Collectable Card Game) allows many characters and events from the game to be mentioned. It follows Urza, an extremely powerful Planeswalker who wants revenge on Phyrexia. The book's predecessor The Brothers War: Artifacts Cycle - Book I tells of a great war between Urza and his brother, Mishra starting over two powerstones created by the Phyrexians. Mishra, deeply corrupted by the demons and mechanical creations of Phyrexia, was killed by Urza. Urza now seeks revenge on Phyrexia for what they have taken away from him. He managed to banish the Phyrexians from his home world, Dominaria. In doing so, his eyes were replaced with the powerstones, the Mightstone and the Meekstone. Urza is now an immortal, nearly omnipotent being. With this power, though, comes madness. Urza obsesses with destroying Phyrexia and its inhabitants. Xantcha is a Phyrexian created "newt," her only purpose being to head to another plane and help towards conquering it. She, however, when assaulted by the demon, Gix, creates a part of herself that is not entirely loyal to Phyrexia. At a time when the Phyrexians are about to destroy her for her disloyalty, Urza comes and saves her, thinking that mayhap she still had a soul. Urza takes Xantcha with him across planes for three main reasons: to study her, to watch her, and to have someone to keep him from completely losing himself in madness. She decides, at on point to attempt to keep Urza off the brink of madness through longing and regret over his brother. She heads to a near town and finds a youth that resembles the dead Mishra in appearance as well as attitude. Together, the two allow Urza to get a better grip of himself. The three must then work, using artifice to stunt the Phyrexian invasion of Dominaria. This book involves many planes (worlds) from the M:tG CCG including Dominaria, Phyrexia, and Serra's Realm. These places may sound odd to most people but anyone who knows the game would recognize the places easily. This is a good and well-written book. It is a story of magical fantasy and revenge. This book, as previously mentioned, was written mainly for the audience of Magic CCG players. However, the larger audience of those that enjoy fantasy books would also enjoy this.

  • None
    2019-05-11 12:06

    Let it be said, first and foremost, that I don't like Magic; The Gathering. So, as to why I picked up a book about it is beyond me, but as it turns out I've very, very glad I did. Ms. Abbey has created in these pages a wonderful and moving story about love, deception, betrayal, and, most of all, patience. Patience with those you love and care about, and patience to achieve your goals. The main character, Xantcha, is perhaps one of the most endearing and human characters I've ever read in a book, which is odd because she's not really human. Actually, she really isn't a "she" at all, she's a sexless newt from the M;TG version of mechanical hell, Phyrexia. Which, oddly enough, makes her seem all the more real, since her feelings are the most human of anyone in the entire story. It's rare to find a book told from the point of view of a sidekick, and that is essentialy what Xantcha is. She follows Urza, an almost Godlike Planeswalker, though the many planes of the universe, aiding the Planeswalker in maintaining his ever-more-fragile grip on reality. While Urza is the focus of most of the action, it is though Xantcha's eyes that we see his exploits, both good and bad. Those looking for a basic swords/magic/elves/dwarves/etc. fantasy should steer well clear of this book. It has it's own take on everything, and it's greatly varied from your basic fantasy reading, almost dipping into the realms of Sci-Fi at times. It has a well done dual-storyline going throughout the book, with the past and present flip-flopping, which has the result of making many of the aspects of the book a mystery. It's worth reading simply to figure out how Xantcha can manage to yawn forth a floating sphere, and why she has her Phyrexian "heart" tucked into her boot for a good deal of the book. All these things are explained in detail, but not until they've been around for a bit. This creates a sense of surprise that assures the book stays fresh to the last page. A satisfying, mind-expanding book. Highly Reccomended.

  • None
    2019-05-14 07:04

    The book is well written, though a bit long-winding at times. It tells the story line behind the (largest part of) MTG Urza's Saga expansion set. The author describes the events through the eyes of a 3th person (Xantcha), so there are still some open questions. "The Brothers War" was slightly better written and that book is interesting for any fantasy-fan. It is a must for Mtg-fans, especially if you like the Artifact-cycle. It tells the story of a lot of the best-known important Magic-figures and places (Urza, Serra, Phyrexia). Also a large part of the new figures introduced in the Artifact-cycle are explained. More so because of the interesting development towards the end of the book. For not Magic-players it is a somewhat too long winding tale on the destruction and regeneration of Urza's mind. Read "The Brothers war" first!

  • None
    2019-05-07 07:17

    The book is well written, though a bit long-winding at times. It tells the story line behind the (largest part of) MTG Urza's Saga expansion set. The author describes the events through the eyes of a 3th person (Xantcha), so there are still some open questions. "The Brothers War" was slightly better written and that book is interesting for any fantasy-fan. It is a must for Mtg-fans, especially if you like the Artifact-cycle. It tells the story of a lot of the best-known important Magic-figures and places (Urza, Serra, Phyrexia). Also a large part of the new figures introduced in the Artifact-cycle are explained. More so because of the interesting development towards the end of the book. For not Magic-players it is a somewhat too long winding tale on the destruction and regeneration of Urza's mind. Read "The Brothers war" first!